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Visual Forensics

Inside the investigation of an officer who killed a teen threatening suicide | Visual Forensics
19:48

Inside the investigation of an officer who killed a teen threatening suicide | Visual Forensics

Update: The Justice Department announced Sept. 9, 2022 that it would not file federal criminal civil rights charges against Officer Jenison. When 17-year-old John Albers posted threats of suicide on social media in January 2018, worried friends called 911 for help. The high school student was backing his family minivan out of the garage when he was shot 13 times by an Overland Park, Kan. police officer who responded to the call and said he feared he’d be struck by the van. Within a month, the prosecutor in Johnson County, Kan., Steve Howe, declared that the fatal shooting was justified and charges would not be filed. Every year in America, police fatally shoot about 1,000 people. In each case, police — often from the same department — investigate the officer, and it’s rare that details of the investigation are made public. But in the case of the death of Albers, something extremely unusual happened: the city of Overland Park released the entire police investigative file and corresponding visuals, after being sued by KSHB-TV. In this case, the Overland Park police did not investigate their own officer. Instead, Johnson County launches an Officer-Involved Shooting Investigation Team after each such incident, using officers from other departments in the county. The nearly 500-page file revealed the investigation was concluded in six days. The Washington Post provided it to five law enforcement experts, veterans of policing, use-of-force investigations and prosecutions. All five found flaws with the investigation, and several said investigators approached the case favoring the perception of the officer, a stance the experts said is common in such cases. The Post’s analysis found steps missing from the investigative report, such as scene diagrams, that some experts said are typically performed in officer-involved shooting investigations. The Post also created a 3D reconstruction, based on available evidence, to show Jenison’s position at each of the moments he fired at Albers. The 3D reconstruction and dash-cam videos showed Albers was close to the van when it first backed out of the garage, and then briefly in the path of the van after it spun around, but he moved out of the van’s path each time and then fired. The Post took the police investigative file, dash-cam videos, expert analysis, interviews with the Albers family and the 3D reconstruction to create an inside look into how police investigated one of their own. Read more: https://wapo.st/3AHlSsA. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
Most of the dead Astroworld Festival victims were in one highly packed area | Visual Forensics
13:39

Most of the dead Astroworld Festival victims were in one highly packed area | Visual Forensics

UPDATE: After this video was published, The Post determined Bharti Shahani, another victim, was also in the south quadrant when the concert began, according to a video she took that was obtained by The Post. In an interview, Shahani's sister, who was with her at the concert, confirmed the location. The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences announced on Dec. 16 that all 10 deaths were due to compression asphyxia, meaning the victims were squeezed so tightly that they lost their ability to draw a breath. *** At least seven of the 10 dead after Travis Scott's Astroworld Festival were clustered in a small area enclosed on three sides by metal barriers that became dangerously crowded, according to a Washington Post investigation. The review — based on dozens of videos examined for when and where each was taken, interviews with witnesses, and an analysis by crowd experts — reveals how a crowd surge at a performance by Scott turned one pocket of the audience into an epicenter of chaos and distress. Ten fans at the Nov. 5 concert in Houston died and dozens more were injured, making it one of the most deadly concerts in the nation’s history. The Post found that most of those who died were close to each other in the viewing area’s south quadrant, where witnesses described people collapsing under the pressure of the crowd. Three concertgoers who died appeared unconscious in a pile of other fallen fans in the south quadrant only 16 minutes into the show, according to a video reviewed by The Post. The concert continued for nearly another hour. In parts of the tightly compressed area where many of the dead were concentrated, there were as little as 1.85 square feet per person, according to an analysis done by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University for The Post. At that density, people are amid a crowd that is at risk of dangerously collapsing in on itself, two crowd science experts said. The Post’s reconstruction of the night’s events, including details evident in exclusively obtained videos, also underscores unanswered questions about how long the concert was allowed to continue after fans already were pleading for help and receiving emergency care. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
D.C. Police requested backup at least 17 times in 78 minutes during Capitol riot | Visual Forensics
18:20

D.C. Police requested backup at least 17 times in 78 minutes during Capitol riot | Visual Forensics

At 1:13 p.m. on Jan. 6, a D.C. police commander facing a swelling crowd of protesters on the west side of the U.S. Capitol made an urgent call for more officers in riot gear. “Hard gear at the Capitol! Hard gear at the Capitol!” Cmdr. Robert Glover shouted into his radio. Over the next 78 minutes, Glover requested backup at least 17 times, according to a Washington Post analysis of the events, and the mob on the west side eventually grew to at least 9,400 people, outnumbering officers by more than 58 to one. The Post reviewed police radio communications, synchronized them with hours of footage and drew on testimony and interviews with police supervisors to understand how failures of preparation and planning played out that day. At The Post’s request, a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University analyzed imagery to estimate the number of people outside the Capitol at precise moments. To visualize those numbers more clearly, The Post created a 3-D model of the Capitol grounds that approximated the crowd from a bird’s-eye view using data from the researchers’ crowd-counting software. The examination reveals how police were hampered by an insufficient number of officers and shortages of less-lethal weapons and protective equipment and also provides a glimpse into communications breakdowns within the police response. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost #WashingtonPost #VisualForensics #CapitolRiot
Inside the U.S. Capitol at the height of the siege | Visual Forensics
14:28

Inside the U.S. Capitol at the height of the siege | Visual Forensics

At 2:12 p.m. on Jan. 6, supporters of President Trump began climbing through a window they had smashed on the northwest side of the U.S. Capitol. “Go! Go! Go!” someone shouted as the rioters, some in military gear, streamed in. It was the start of the most serious attack on the Capitol since the War of 1812. The mob coursed through the building, enraged that Congress was preparing to make Trump’s electoral defeat official. “Drag them out! … Hang them out!” rioters yelled at one point, as they gathered near the House chamber. Officials in the House and Senate secured the doors of their respective chambers, but lawmakers were soon forced to retreat to undisclosed locations. Five people died on the grounds that day, including a Capitol police officer. In all, more than 50 officers were injured. To reconstruct the pandemonium inside the Capitol, The Washington Post examined text messages, photos and hundreds of videos, some of which were exclusively obtained. By synchronizing the footage and locating some of the camera angles within a digital 3-D model of the building, The Post was able to map the rioters’ movements and assess how close they came to lawmakers — in some cases feet apart or separated only by a handful of vastly outnumbered police officers. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost #WashingtonPost #VisualForensics #CapitolRiot
Infrared video shows the risks of airborne coronavirus spread | Visual Forensics
06:12

Infrared video shows the risks of airborne coronavirus spread | Visual Forensics

Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK As winter approaches, the United States is grappling with a jaw-dropping surge in the number of novel coronavirus infections. More than 288,000 Americans have been killed by a virus that public health officials now say can be spread through airborne transmission. The virus spreads most commonly through close contact, scientists say. But under certain conditions, people farther than six feet apart can become infected by exposure to tiny droplets and particles exhaled by an infected person, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in October. Those droplets and particles can linger in the air for minutes to hours. To visually illustrate the risk of airborne transmission in real time, The Washington Post used a military-grade infrared camera capable of detecting exhaled breath. Numerous experts — epidemiologists, virologists and engineers — supported the notion of using exhalation as a conservative proxy to show potential transmission risk in various settings. The highly sensitive camera system detects variations in infrared radiation that are not visible to the naked eye. The technology is more typically used in military and industrial settings, such as detecting methane gas leaks in pipelines. In 2013, it was deployed by law enforcement during the 20-hour manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombers. But fitted with a filter that specifically targets the infrared signature of carbon dioxide, the camera can be used to map in real time the partial path of the nearly invisible particles we exhale. Watch the video to learn more. Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/ #WashingtonPost #VisualForensics
Tracking Alexei Navalny's last movements before he was allegedly poisoned | Visual Forensics
07:36

Tracking Alexei Navalny's last movements before he was allegedly poisoned | Visual Forensics

Prominent Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny was allegedly poisoned on Aug. 20 in Russia’s Tomsk Airport before he boarded a flight to Moscow. Navalny is the latest addition to a long list of Kremlin critics to face suspected or confirmed poisoning. The Washington Post analyzed videos and photos — a mix of open-source material, social media posts and flight paths — to retrace Navanly’s steps in the days leading up to his suspected poisoning. While the available visual evidence does not reveal how he was poisoned or when, it provides a record for whom Navalny came into contact with and where he visited in the days prior. Navalny had been in Novosibirsk and then Tomsk to meet with activists and opposition candidates for regional elections next month. A photograph shows Navalny drinking tea at a cafe in the Tomsk airport - the only thing his spokeswoman saw him eat or drink the day of his flight. Video captures Navalny wailing in pain after the plane took off and he lost consciousness by the time the plane made an emergency landing in the city of Omsk. German doctors said clinical results indicate he was poisoned. Russian media reported that he was under constant surveillance by federal security agents during the trip, though the Kremlin has denied that President Vladimir Putin was involved in Navalny’s poisoning. Russia has yet to open a criminal investigation into the incident, despite Western governments’ calls to do so. The Russian doctor’s who initially treated Navalny at Omsk Hospital No. 1 said there was no evidence of poisoning. Navalny’s allies - family and colleagues - accused physicians of initially blocking is transfer to Berlin because they faced pressure from authorities seeking to hinder investigation into the incident. #WashingtonPost #VisualForensics #AlexeiNavalny
Video and photos show Bolsonaro defied health guidelines before testing positive for the coronavirus
08:00

Video and photos show Bolsonaro defied health guidelines before testing positive for the coronavirus

For months, even as the coronavirus pandemic grew into a debilitating national crisis, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro did everything he could to downplay it. He called on people to return to normal. He waded into crowds of supporters. He repeatedly described it as nothing more than a little flu. Now Brazil is experiencing the world’s second-worst coronavirus outbreak — with 1.8 million infected and 70,000 dead — and one of the latest people to test positive for covid-19 is Bolsonaro himself. The Washington Post analyzed hundreds of videos and photos of Bolsonaro to retrace his steps in the two weeks before he first reported symptoms on July 5. The visual evidence shows that Bolsonaro not only met with far more people than his official schedule suggests, but that he routinely flouted public health guidelines. He at times wore a mask and maintained a distance of six feet from others. But just as frequently, he met with people without a mask, shook hands and even hugged supporters. 2:18 - June 23: A judge orders Bolsonaro to wear a mask when in public spaces in Brasilia and the surrounding federal district. 4:10 - June 27: Bolsonaro visited the town of Araguari in the state of Minas Gerais. Several photos and videos from the visit show him without a mask interacting with crowds. 5:53 - July 3: One hundred and eight Planalto Palace employees tested positive for the coronavirus, according to Brazil’s General Secretariat. 6:33 - July 4: Bolsonaro attended a July 4 party at the residence of the U.S. ambassador to Brazil. Photos show the two men unmasked, standing shoulder to shoulder. 7:05 - July 7: Bolsonaro held a small news conference to tell the gathered reporters, clustered nearby, that he’d tested positive for the coronavirus. And then he took off his mask. Bolsonaro is now isolated, but how he got to this point is revealed in the weeks before. Editor's note: At 0:49 and 6:06 we identified Paulo Skaf incorrectly. We regret the error.

The Fact Checker

Did coronavirus accidentally escape from a Wuhan lab? It’s doubtful. | The Fact Checker
10:18

Did coronavirus accidentally escape from a Wuhan lab? It’s doubtful. | The Fact Checker

In the absence of crucial information on how the novel coronavirus began many theories have gained traction — one is that the virus accidentally escaped from a lab in Wuhan, China. But does any evidence support that origin story? There are a number of reasons why this theory has gained traction over the past few weeks, primarily because U.S. intelligence and lawmakers have said they want to investigate it. At least two labs in Wuhan research bat coronaviruses: the Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Wuhan branch of the Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They have become a focal point of suspicion, in part because of their proximity to the Huanan seafood market, where a cluster of the first cases of the new coronavirus appeared. Speculation has also been heightened because of the actions of Chinese officials. Before the Chinese government had even alerted the WHO to the growing epidemic, scientists were told to destroy early samples of the virus, according to the Straits Times, making it difficult to find the virus’s origins. The Fact Checker spoke to several scientists and researchers about what, if any, evidence there is that a lab accident led to the release of the virus that causes covid-19. Read more: https://wapo.st/3bVFU3E. SPECIAL OFFER: To thank you for your support, here’s a deal on a Washington Post digital subscription: $29 for one year http://washingtonpost.com/youtubeoffer. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
These campaign ads may have misled you. Here's how to spot their tricks. | The Fact Checker
05:37

These campaign ads may have misled you. Here's how to spot their tricks. | The Fact Checker

When it comes to campaign ads, there’s a lot to be wary of. Not only do they interrupt favorite TV shows, sneak into social feeds and infiltrate dinner conversations, but they can also be misleading or false. Campaign videos weren’t always part of presidential cycles. When only nine percent of Americans had televisions in 1950, commercials weren’t a top priority for candidates. By 1960, that number exploded to nearly 90 percent. “The ads that were run are pretty primitive,” said Washington Post Chief Correspondent Dan Balz. “I mean they’re cartoonish, they’re jingles.” It wasn’t until a small girl picking daises in a 1964 ad for Lyndon B. Johnson did political advertising change, ushering in the era of negative campaign advertising. Today, there are a number of ways that campaign ads can use manipulated video — a recent Trump ad uses stock images over testimonials, giving the impression that the on-camera actors are real Trump supporters. So, while you’re watching campaign ads in the 2020 election cycle, keep these three things in mind. 1. Is there a possibility that a politician’s soundbite has been taken out of context and that it’s maybe not the full truth? 2. Ads are trying to convey a particular message. Does this one square with your general perception of the candidate? If not, do some research. 3. Check the source. Campaign ads make references to sources but some are more legitimate than others. And, of course, let us know if we should look into a potentially misleading ad. Read more about how we classify manipulated video: https://wapo.st/manipulatedvideo. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Watch more Fact Checker videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8QBkS_wk32U4bxlNx2PNEUFFAWb_xfCB Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
The Amazon rainforest in Brazil is burning. Who started the fires? | The Fact Checker
07:36

The Amazon rainforest in Brazil is burning. Who started the fires? | The Fact Checker

As the Amazon rainforest in Brazil burns, it seems like everyone is in search of someone to blame. There have been nearly 100,000 fires detected this year so far but who or what is responsible? Fires in the rainforest don’t start themselves, but that doesn’t mean they are unusual. Every year in the dry season, between August and October, deforestation fires are set by people who are clearing land for a wide variety of reasons — farming, ranching, mining, illicit activities, infrastructure. Like many natural resources, the Amazon is caught in a tug of war between economic growth and environmental protections — and in that war politics almost always come into play. Some in the international community were quick to blame Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro for the flames. But he said non-governmental organizations were behind the fires and his environmental minister, Ricardo Salles, claimed the weather was an intensifier. Environmental activists pointed to large agribusinesses. And 2020 Democratic presidential candidate former congressman John Delaney (D-Md.) said it was Trump’s trade war with China that started it all. All of those explanations can’t be accurate simultaneously, since they contradict each other. The Fact Checker digs into what exactly has been going on in the fight over Brazil’s natural resources. Read more: https://wapo.st/2AJbWza. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

Theirstory

theirstoryBAFTALaurels.jpg

We’ve been taught that men were the only ones doing anything worthwhile in prehistory. Theirstory introduces the female anthropologists who dared to ask, “Where’s the other half of the species?”

The film takes viewers on an eye-opening and at time humorous journey through a dizzying array of archival footage, location shooting, stop-motion animation, and incisive interviews to ask how a reconfiguring of past gender assumptions – such as man the hunter and woman the gatherer - can radically change the ingrained beliefs we hold about who we are and where we come from. ​

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